Knight News Challenge: Speed Dating Results

December 2, 2013

As you prepare for this week’s Knight News Challenge presentations, I wanted to give you an idea of where your proposals stood in the eyes of your classmates (and in relation to them). The table below is not necessarily indicative of your final grade – a good rating from your classmates doesn’t necessarily mean a good fit for the project, and a poor one doesn’t necessarily mean the project has no hope. Have a look:

(KEY: C = Category; Fit = Fit with Category; Inn = Innovation; Acc = Improved Public Access to Information)

First Name Last Name C Fit Inn Acc TOTAL AVG
Timothy Saar M 9.22 9.22 8.67 27.11 9.04
Ian Moore M 9.44 8.67 8.89 27.00 9.00
Kevin Duvall D 9.00 8.78 8.89 26.67 8.89
Whitney Godwin M 8.11 9.22 9.22 26.56 8.85
Ryan Glaspell M 8.89 8.89 8.67 26.44 8.81
Eva Buchman M 9.00 8.22 8.89 26.11 8.70
Samantha Cart N 8.67 8.33 8.67 25.67 8.56
Emily Cotter H 9.00 8.22 8.44 25.67 8.56
Abigail Campbell M 8.22 8.11 9.11 25.44 8.48
Ilyssa Miroshnik M 8.67 8.22 8.56 25.44 8.48
Natalie Snyder H 9.11 7.89 8.44 25.44 8.48
Karlea Pack D 8.67 8.33 8.33 25.33 8.44
Daniel Krotz M 8.56 7.56 8.44 24.56 8.19
Madison Blankenship M 8.89 7.67 7.78 24.33 8.11
Michael Martin M 7.67 7.78 8.44 23.89 7.96
Zachary Voreh M 8.78 7.89 7.22 23.89 7.96
Rachel Simpkins N 7.67 7.44 7.67 22.78 7.59
Ryan Fadus N 7.67 6.33 7.44 21.44 7.15
Bryan Bumgardner Not Present
Trent Cunningham Not Present
Charles Richardson Not Present

One note: It’s typical that the resulting scores of the speed dating assignments tend to be a little … inflated. Perhaps it’s an effect of having the person you’re evaluating sitting across from you, but bear this in mind when making tweaks, because I will have no such anxiety in my own grading (not to sound ominous, just straightforward).


Read & Respond week 14 – Past Knight Challenge Winners (and some ARGs)

November 13, 2013

This week, your overview assignment for the Knight News Challenge assignment is due. To assist in that, you’ll be looking at some past winners in your chosen area of interest (so you might want to choose one). There’s a second part to the reading assignment as well – on ARGs – which I’ll post below.

Part 1: KNC Winners

Each of you has to choose one of five areas of interest for your initial proposal (due Tuesday, Nov. 19):

Take a look at the original announcement and the winners for the area you’ve chosen. Don’t just watch the video at the top. Check out their pitch videos or presentations, if they’re available. In the first part of your response, you’ll do the following:

  1. Name the area you’ve chosen from the list.
  2. Discuss how past winners inform your own ideas.

Part 2: ARGs

This part will be kind of strange compared to what we’ve done so far this semester. I’d like you to learn a bit about Alternate Reality Games, or ARGs. This list from Cracked covers some of the best known ARGs, including The Beast (arguably the first), ilovebees, and others. A more recent example is The Institute – watch this introduction and try not to get confused. In fact, here’s a list of ARGs, many of which are happening all around us RIGHT NOW. Weird, huh?

(By the way, there are a number of frequently used tricks you’ll see again and again in ARGs. Might come in handy, no?)

ARGs have been used for promotion for years: ilovebees, for example, was a marketing gimmick for Halo 2. What do you think of the form? Is there a journalistic application here? Could you use it in a stratcomm campaign? What can we take away from this alternative storytelling approach?

Responses are due as a comment to this post by noon, Monday, November 18.


Knight News Challenge 2013

November 12, 2013

We have spent this semester applying new tools to the news and exploring a number of innovations in communication. Now it’s your turn. You will create an innovation project to the Knight News Challenge. This project “aims to accelerate innovation in news and information by funding the best new ideas and supporting them with a network of peers and advisors.”

Areas of Focus

You will choose ONE of the five areas below (from the 2012 and 2013 challenges). Further details, links, and past winner examples are available on the course blog:

  • Networks: The Internet, and the mini-computers in our pockets, enable us to connect with one another, friends and strangers, in new ways. Witness the roles of networks in the formation, coverage and discussion of recent events such as the rise of the Tea Party, flash mobs, the Arab Spring, last summer’s UK riots and the Occupy movement. We’re looking for ideas that build on the rise of existing network events and tools – that deliver news and information and extend our understanding of the phenomenon.
  • Data: Tools and approaches that use data in new, civically valuable ways. This might include ways to collect new data no one has gathered before, using data for novel applications in journalism or media, or making it useful or interactive for a new audience.
  • Mobile: For many of us around the world, mobile has become an important tool for learning what’s going on around us, and for sharing details about our lives with friends, neighbors and strangers. So, send us your ideas for harnessing mobile to improve news, information, communities and democracy.
  • Open Gov: Projects will provide new tools and approaches to improve the way people and governments interact. They tackle a range of issues from making it easier to open a local business to creating a simulator that helps citizens visualize the impact of public policies on communities.
  • Health: Innovative ideas to harness information and data for the health of communities. The challenge’s definition of “health data” and “news” is broad, including ideas that range from the public to the personal that: make large datasets useful; help inform communities; encourage healthier lifestyle choices; and engage others in the sharing of useful health data.

You do NOT need to be a technical maestro. You just need an idea that meets the above criteria and a pitch for why it’s worth funding. Past entrants have incorporated SHORT video pitches – this is not required, but you might want to consider it.

Requirements:

  • A name and 200-word (FIRM) description of your proposal (identify which area you’re using and provide a word count). See past proposals on the site for examples. Due: Tuesday, Nov. 19
  • A presentation of your proposal. These, likewise, are not long – 5 minutes max – and use of visual and digital techniques is STRONGLY encouraged. We’ll discuss these in the weeks before the due date to help firm up your ideas. Due: Tuesday-Thursday Dec. 3 & 5
  • Final project proposal. A revised 200-word pitch, a second page explaining how you revised it from class feedback, and a mockup design (paper, online, or video) of what your project might look like. Due: Tuesday, Dec. 10

Full information at: http://www.newschallenge.org/


Knight News Challenge 2012

April 10, 2012

We have spent this semester applying new tools to the news and exploring a number of innovations in communication. Now it’s your turn. You will submit an innovation project to the Knight News Challenge. This project “seek(s) innovations that use new or available technology to distribute content in local communities,” and it offers millions of dollars in development awards to make your project a reality.

The Rules

For your project, you’ll come up with a short, simple writeup and presentation of your innovation project and why it deserves some of that money. The latest round of the Knight News Challenge had a focus on networks (you can see the specifics here). Although the March 17 submission deadline is now closed, we’ll use this as our format too. From the KNC site:

The Networks challenge round seeks projects that use the best of existing software and platforms – those already integrated into people’s lives – to find new ways to convey news and information. Winners will be announced in June. Future categories will be announced later this year. Each of the three rounds will be eight to 10 weeks long, for shorter, more focused contests that better mirror the pace of innovation. Anyone, anywhere can apply.

The rules are available here (READ THIS), but overall you should:

  1. Use digital, open-source technology.
  2. Distribute news in the public interest.

You do NOT need to be a technical maestro (but it helps if you can find one to work with). You just need an idea that meets the above criteria and a pitch for why it’s worth funding – the Knight money will cover development and promotion. Past entrants have incorporated SHORT video pitches – this is not required, but you might want to consider it.

The Proposal

Your proposal will be a short writeup with seven sections – please note the word counts (they’re serious about these):

0. Name of your project (e.g., “Factlink,” “Bias Map”)

1. What do you propose to do? [20 words]

2. Is anyone doing something like this now, and how is your project different? [30 words]

3. Describe the network with which you intend to build or work. [50 words]

4. Why will it work? [100 words]

5. Who is working on it? [100 words] – NOTE: You probably don’t have an existing team, so just discuss who might be involved.

6. What part of the project have you already built? [100 words] – NOTE: Again, you probably don’t have anything built yet, so you can discuss a little about any existing resources you may have here.

7. How would you sustain the project after the funding expires? [50 words]

Requirements:

  • A writeup of your proposal. These are not long (a page or two) but must be detailed and address each of the seven KNC questions (see above). See past proposals on the site for examples. DUE IN CLASS APRIL 17
  • A presentation of your proposal. These, likewise, are not long – 5 to 10 minutes – and use of visual and digital techniques is STRONGLY encouraged. We’ll discuss these in the weeks before the due date to help firm up your ideas. DUE IN CLASS APRIL 24

Useful links:

A final note: The requirements of this assignment have changed to what’s listed here now. If you’ve already started on the previous assignment (rules listed here) and don’t think you can change to fit this format, you can continue with that format – just let me know so I’m not surprised by your submission.


Knight News Challenge

April 5, 2011

We have spent this semester applying new tools to the news and exploring a number of innovations in communication. Now it’s your turn. You will submit an innovation project to the Knight News Challenge. This project “seek(s) innovations that use new or available technology to distribute content in local communities,” and it offers $5 million in awards. The rules are:

  1. Use digital, open-source technology.
  2. Distribute news in the public interest.
  3. Fit one of the four categories.

You do NOT need to be a technical maestro (but it helps if you can find one to work with). You just need an idea that meets the above criteria and a pitch for why it’s worth funding – the Knight money will cover development and promotion. Past entrants have incorporated SHORT video pitches – this is not required, but you might want to consider it.

Your proposal must fit one of the KNC’s four categories:

  1. Mobile:  Seeks projects that use mobile devices to produce, deliver, consume, share and otherwise engage with news. The category reflects the fact that the mobile phone, with 5 billion units in use, has become an important tool for news.
  2. Authenticity category: Looks for projects that help people better understand the reliability of news and information sources. We’re hoping to identify promising ideas for helping citizens negotiate our oft-chaotic media world. How can we help news users better evaluate the validity and trustworthiness of news and information? How can we better filter and assess the credibility of what we read and watch?
  3. Sustainability: Considers new economic models supporting news and information. New ways of conducting and consuming journalism may require new ways of paying for it. We’re open to ideas for generating revenue as well as ways to reduce costs.
  4. Community: Seeks groundbreaking technologies that support news and information specifically within defined geographic areas. This is designed to jump-start work on technologies and approaches that haven’t arrived yet. Unlike the first three categories, submissions in this area must be tested in a geographically designated community.

Requirements:

  • A writeup of your proposal. These are not long (a page or two) but must be detailed and fit the KNC criteria. See past proposals on the site for examples.
  • A presentation of your proposal. These, likewise, are not long – 5 to 10 minutes – and use of visual and digital techniques is STRONGLY encouraged. We’ll discuss these two weeks before the due date to help firm up your ideas.

Due dates:

  • Project rough drafts (one page): April 12
  • Final proposal and in-class presentations: April 26

Useful links:


Innovation Projects

April 25, 2010

(Note: You received this assignment some time ago, but I thought it’d be helpful to have in one place as things come due this week)

We have spent this semester applying new tools to the news and exploring a number of innovations in communication. Now it’s your turn. You will submit an innovation project to the Knight News Challenge. This project “seek(s) innovations that use new or available technology to distribute content in local communities,” and it offers $5 million in awards. The rules are:

  1. Use digital, open-source technology.
  2. Distribute news in the public interest.
  3. Test your project in a local community.

You do NOT need to be a technical maestro (but it helps if you can find some to work with). You just need an idea that meets the above criteria and a pitch for why it’s worth funding – the Knight money will cover development and promotion. Past entrants have incorporated SHORT video pitches – this is not required, but you might want to consider it.

Requirements:

  • A writeup of your proposal. These are not long but must be detailed and fit the KNC criteria. See past proposals on the site for examples.
  • A presentation of your proposal. These, likewise, are not long – 5 to 10 minutes – and use of visual and digital techniques is STRONGLY encouraged. We’ll discuss these a week before the due date to help firm up your ideas.

Due dates:

  • In-class presentations: April 27
  • Final proposal: April 27 (at the start of class)
  • Knight proposal due date: Fall 2010 (specific dates not yet posted, so you’ve got plenty of time to clean it up after the semester ends!)

Full information here: http://www.newschallenge.org/

FAQs answered at: http://www.newschallenge.org/content/frequently-asked-questions